Katharine Sarah Moody

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Research Associate in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Liverpool, working on the Philosophy and Religious Practices Network (http://philosophyreligion.wordpress.com/). My research centres on the relationship between continental philosophy, radical theology and lived religion, and especially between John D. Caputo, Jacques Derrida, Alain Badiou, Slavoj Zizek, and emerging Christianity. Get in touch with me via Twitter @KSMoody and follow the work I'm doing with the Philosophy and Religious Practices Network via @PhilRelPractice

twitter.com/KSMoody:

    Sunday, July 14, 2013 A photo of the organisers and presenters at the second Philosophy and Religious Practices network workshop, “Buddhism and Human Flourishing” (University of Chester, June 25 2013).
The back row, left to right: Prof. Peter Harvey, Ratnaguna, Dr Chris Baker, Dr Dan Whistler, and Dr Paramabandhu Groves
The front row, left to right: Caroline Brazier, Dr Patrice Haynes, Dr Katharine Sarah Moody, Dr Wendy Dossett, Gina Clayton, Dr Mary Welford.

    A photo of the organisers and presenters at the second Philosophy and Religious Practices network workshop, “Buddhism and Human Flourishing” (University of Chester, June 25 2013).

    The back row, left to right: Prof. Peter Harvey, Ratnaguna, Dr Chris Baker, Dr Dan Whistler, and Dr Paramabandhu Groves

    The front row, left to right: Caroline Brazier, Dr Patrice Haynes, Dr Katharine Sarah Moody, Dr Wendy Dossett, Gina Clayton, Dr Mary Welford.

    — 9 months ago with 1 note

    #philosophy and religious practices network  #buddhism 

    A talk by Slavoj Zizek, entitled “The Buddhist Ethic and the Spirit of Global Capitalism”, delivered in 2012, and mentioned by Wendy Dossett, Peter Harvey, and John Reader at the second Philosophy and Religious Practices network workshop, “Buddhism and Human Flourishing” (University of Chester, June 25th 2013).

    — 9 months ago

    #slavoj zizek  #buddhism  #john reader  #wendy dossett  #peter harvey  #philosophy and religious practices network  #western buddhism  #video 
    John Reader Reflects on understandings of the human →

    Stemming from the second Philosophy and Religious Practices network workshop, “Buddhism and Human Flourishing”, John Reader reflects on understandings of the human. In particular, he writes about the differences between Buddhist concepts of the human, found in contemporary Buddhist psychotherapy, and the concepts of the human that arise in the work of psychoanalysts like Jacques Lacan and of political philosophers influenced by him, including Slavoj Zizek.

    — 9 months ago

    #john reader  #philosophy and religious practices network  #buddhism  #human  #human being  #humanity  #human flourishing  #flourishing  #psychoanalysis  #jacques lacan  #lacan  #slavoj zizek  #zizek  #psychotherapy  #buddhist psychotherapy  #buddhist psychology  #psychology  #lacanian psychoanalysis  #terry eagleton 
    Buddhism and Human Flourishing Report (link) →

    Report by Wendy Dossett on the second Philosophy and Religious Practices networks workshop, “Buddhism and Human Flourishing” (University of Chester, June 25th 2013) with keynotes from Ratnaguna and Peter Harvey.

    — 9 months ago

    #philosophy and religious practices network  #buddhism  #wendy dossett  #humanity  #human being  #human flourishing  #flourishing  #philosophy  #religion  #religious practice  #religious studies 
    Saturday, July 13, 2013

    Jack Caputo’s keynote, “Apocalyptic Nihilism”, at the 18th Villanova philosophy conference, “Apocalyptic Politics: Framing the Present”, Apr 13 2013.

    — 9 months ago with 1 note

    #john d. caputo  #caputo  #john caputo  #jack caputo  #apocalypse  #nihilism  #villanova  #video 
    Wednesday, July 10, 2013

    Homebrewed Christianity podcast of Jack Caputo's keynote, “Can Postmodern Theology Live in the Churches? Perhaps”, from “Subverting the Norm II" (Drury University, Springfield, Missouri, Apr 5-6 2013) and of Tony Jones' “response”.

    — 9 months ago with 2 notes

    #john caputo  #jack caputo  #john d caputo  #john d. caputo  #caputo  #tony jones  #subverting the norm  #stn  #stn2  #stn2013  #homebrewed christianity  #postmodern theology  #radical theology  #theology  #church practice  #The Church  #church  #perhaps 
    Tuesday, June 18, 2013 The Church That Dies (link) →

    Link to a post I wrote for the PCN Britain blog, “The Church That Dies”, Part Two of a series on “Dying to the Law”. Part One is here.

    — 10 months ago with 1 note

    #progressive christianity  #progressive christian network  #pcn  #pcnbritain 
    Wednesday, June 5, 2013 The God Who Dies (link) →

    Link to a piece I wrote for the Progressive Christian Network (Britain) blog on “The God Who Dies”.

    — 10 months ago

    #progressive christianity  #progressive christian network  #pcn  #pcnbritain  #articles be me 
    Saturday, June 1, 2013 New Paul, New Perspectives, New Praxis

    Today I was in Swindon for a community learning day put on by John Skinner, founder of the Northumbria Community, and Emigre Connexion - a new monasticism guru. He’s interested in the intersection of new monasticism, eastern orthodoxy and radical theology.

    The learning day was about starting a conversation about new theological perspectives that could lead to new praxis, and my talk, entitled “Subverting the Norm: New Paul, New Perspectives, New Praxis”, was about new philosophical interpretations of Paul’s Letters. I talked about Paul on the relationship between sin and the law, our split subjectivity (split between the law and the desire to transgress the law), dying to the law, the suspension of socio-symbolic identity or selfhood, and the creation of a new universal community of love.

    At the end of my talk, I asked the audience to think about the following questions:

    • What are this community’s markers of identity?
    • Might they need to be suspended and subverted in order to enable the transformation of others?
    • What are some of the norms, identities and roles within this community?
    • And how can they be temporarily suspended  in order to
    • Encounter one another apart from our existing social identities and role?
    • Experience each other in our uniqueness or ‘singularity’?
    • And encourage each other to create new forms of subjectivity and selfhood?

    I really enjoyed the day, getting to know John and the Kingshill Community in Swindon, and testing out whether, as I wondered in a previous post (here), I can “speak to the churches” as well as to academics.

    A lot of what John had to say really resonated with my thinking recently about not only intellectually engaging but also existentially experiencing (here, here and here). Here are some of my tweets from today:

    Read more
    — 10 months ago with 1 note

    #new monasticism  #eastern orthodoxy  #radical theology  #saint paul  #john skinner  #emigre  #emigre connexion  #the northumbria community  #northumbria community  #subverting the norm  #kingshill community swindon  #peter rollins  #pete rollins  #rob bell  #perversion  #hysteria  #pervert  #hysteric  #slavoj zizek  #zizek  #fresh expressions  #identity  #identity suspension  #subjectivity  #transformation  #twitter 
    Tuesday, May 28, 2013 Book (P)review - Religion, Politics and the Earth by Clayton Crockett and Jeffrey W. Robbins →

    I just posted a piece by Clayton Crockett and Jeff Robbins on responses to their book, Religion, Politics and the Earth: The New Materialism over at Political Theology's blog.

    — 10 months ago

    #clayton crockett  #Jeffrey W. Robbins  #jeff robbins  #materialism  #radical theology  #political theology  #radical political theology 
    Friday, May 17, 2013 A Plea for Seeing Ourselves as Strange (and probably Racist and Misogynist)

    Seeing yourself through the eyes of others can be transformative, but only if you let their critiques lead you to serious self-reflection rather than dismissal or denial.

    A few days ago, Christena Cleveland - the Center for Diversity and Reconciliation keynote speaker at the recent Subverting the Norm II conference - wrote a post in her blog series “Diversity Repellent" (a series about "the subtle but powerful things that we do and say that make diverse people think twice about building community with us"), which reflected on part of what Tony Jones said at that conference.

    Under the 5th (“Be loyal to this tribe”) of his 13 points, Tony said, “We have a better version of the gospel than the regnant view of the gospel in the West today”.

    Just as Christena did, I took Tony’s “we” to indicate those gathered at this conference - academics and practitioners interested in the relationship between postmodern or radical theology and church practice. But, this form of theology is located within a specific trajectory in western thought. And this heritage means that neither it (postmodern or radical theology) nor we (those gathered at the conference) are particularly diverse (see also this post here where I reflected on the question of diversity after the STN2 conference).

    In her post, Christena asks,

    How can a gospel that is mostly (if not entirely) interpreted and articulated by a homogenous group of people (in this case, white, well-educated males) be the “better version”? But in a more subtle way, his statement sent a clear and powerful message to all of the diverse people in the room (e.g., women, people of color, people without advanced degrees, etc.). No need to join our movement; we don’t need diverse voices. We’ve already got the best version of the Gospel and we only needed white, well-educated men to figure it out. Diverse people need not apply.

    She concludes that,

    people of all cultures run the risk of alienating diverse people if they mistakenly believe that their homogenous group has basically figured out how to think, worship and live.

    We might say we want diverse people to participate in our group but we are often too enamored with our own culture (e.g., our version of the Gospel) to invite diverse people to influence it. Rather, than actively seeking input from diverse people, we require them to assimilate to and bow down to the dominant culture. This approach might work to attract people who look diverse (in terms of race/ethnicity, etc.) but it will repel people who offer culturally-diverse perspectives.

    Responding more to Christena’s choice of visual illustration than perhaps to the substance of her critique, Tony then said, ‘I’m Tired of Being Called a Racist”. He wrote, “Are her words, combined with that image, meant to imply that I am a racist? The answer can only be yes.”

    image

    Read more
    — 11 months ago with 2 notes

    #racism  #sexism  #misogyny  #emerging christianity  #emergence christianity  #emergent church  #emerging church  #peter rollins  #tony jones  #christena cleveland  #sarah moon  #dianna anderson  #stn2  #stn  #subverting the norm  #diversity  #the evangelism project  #ikon  #idolatry of god  #idolatry of god retreat  #homophobia  #gay  #homosexuality  #transformation 
    Tuesday, May 14, 2013 Malabou and Lived Religion (link) →

    Link to the text of Liam Jonestalk on Catherine Malabou, plasticity and lived religion, presented at the first workshop from the Philosophy and Religious Practices network, “The Humanities and Lived Religion: Philosophy, Religious Studies and the Impact Agenda” (May 9th 2013, hosted by the University of Liverpool).

    — 11 months ago

    #liam jones  #catherine malabou  #plasticity  #lived religion  #humanities  #philosophy  #impact  #philosophy and religious practices network  #conference  #conferences